Cleat for a tent

Abstract

A cleat comprising a body comprising a first portion and that defines a web cutout and a tent pole cutout, and a second portion that defines a guy rope cutout, and the body comprising a bend where the first portion and the second portion meet. The cleat is made of steel or other non-cast metal, and can withstand loading imposed by humans and ratchets without failing. In an embodiment, the first portion comprises a rectangular shape and the second portion comprises a trapezoidal shape, and the first portion and the second portion meet at a bend. The cleat further comprises a web wrapping portion formed adjacent to the web cutout, and a clip is provided. The clip is received in the web cutout and fitted about the web wrapping portion, the clip for preventing a canopy web of a tent from wearing out when the cleat is attached to the canopy web.

Claims

What is claimed: 1 . A cleat comprising: a) a body; b) the body comprising a first portion that defines a web cutout and a tent pole cutout, and a second portion that defines a guy rope cutout, and the first portion is planar and the second portion is planar; and c) the body comprising a bend where the first portion and the second portion meet, the first portion and second portion folded towards one another at the bend so that the first portion and second portion are not coplanar. 2 . The cleat of claim 1 wherein at the bend the first portion and the second portion make an angle of about 145 degrees to about 165 degrees with relative to each other. 3 . The cleat of claim 1 wherein the first portion is rectangular shaped and the second portion is trapezoidal shaped. 4 . The cleat of claim 1 wherein the body comprises steel, stainless steel, or steel alloys, and other suitable steel alloys. 5 . The cleat of claim 1 wherein the body comprises cold rolled steel. 6 . The cleat of claim 1 wherein the body is about three millimeters to about seven millimeters thick. 7 . The cleat of claim 1 wherein the body is made from a non-cast metal. 8 . The cleat of claim 1 further comprising: a) a web wrapping portion formed adjacent to the web cutout in the first portion, the web wrapping portion for allowing a clip to fitted around it when the clip is received in the web cutout, and wherein the clip is for preventing a canopy web of a tent from wearing out when the cleat is attached to the canopy web. 9 . The cleat of claim 8 wherein the clip comprises plastic, metal, or combinations thereof. 10 . A cleat for a tent comprising: a) a body comprising a first side wall, a second side wall, a surrounding side wall extending between the first side wall and second side wall, and a bend in the first side wall, the second side wall, and the surrounding side wall; b) a web cutout, a tent pole cutout, and a guy rope cutout defined through the body; and c) wherein at the bend the body is bent such that the first side wall is partly folded in upon itself. 11 . The cleat of claim 10 wherein at the bend the first side wall makes about a 145 degree angle to about a 165 degree angle with itself. 12 . The cleat of claim 10 wherein the body comprises a first portion that is rectangular shaped and the body further comprises a second portion that is trapezoidal shaped. 13 . The cleat of claim 10 wherein the body comprises steel, stainless steel, or steel alloys. 14 . The cleat of claim 10 wherein the body comprises cold rolled steel. 15 . The cleat of claim 10 wherein the surrounding side wall comprises a thickness of about three millimeters to seven millimeters. 16 . The cleat of claim 10 wherein the body is made from a non-cast metal. 17 . The cleat of claim 10 further comprising: a) a web wrapping portion formed adjacent to the web cutout, the web wrapping portion for having a clip fitted about it with the clip received in the web cutout, the clip for preventing a canopy web of a tent from wearing out when the cleat is attached to the canopy web. 18 . A cleat and clip assembly for a tent comprising: a) a body comprising a first side wall, a second side wall, a surrounding side wall extending between the first side wall and second side wall, and a bend in the first side wall second side wall and surrounding side wall, and wherein at the bend the body is bent such that the first side wall is partly folded in on itself; b) a web cutout, a tent pole cutout, and a guy rope cutout defined through the body; c) a web wrapping portion formed adjacent to the web cutout; and d) a clip, the clip fitted about the web wrapping portion and the clip received in the web cutout, the clip for preventing a canopy web of a tent from wearing out when the cleat is attached to the canopy web. 19 . The clip of claim 19 wherein the clip comprises flat sidewalls, a flat top, and comprises plastic, metal, and combinations thereof. 20 . A method of making a cleat comprising the steps of: a) providing a sheet of steel; b) stamping a web cutout, a tent pole cutout, and a guy rope cutout in the sheet of steel; and c) bending the sheet of steel and forming a body comprising a first portion and a second portion, the first portion comprising the tent pole cutout and the web cutout, and the second portion comprising the guy rope cutout. 21 . The method of claim 20 wherein the step of providing a sheet of steel comprises providing a sheet of cold rolled steel. 22 . The method of claim 20 comprising the further step of substituting a sheet of stainless steel or sheet of steel alloy for the sheet of steel. 23 . The method of claim 20 wherein the step of bending the steel comprises the act of bending the first portion and the second portion to about an angle of about 145 degrees to about 165 degrees relative to one another. 24 . The method according to claim 20 further comprising the step of installing the body in a tent to provide structural support for the tent. 25 . An erected tent comprising: a) a cleat comprising a body; b) the body comprising a first portion that defines a web cutout and a tent pole cutout, and a second portion that defines a guy rope cutout, and the first portion is planar and the second portion is planar; c) the body comprising a bend where the first portion and the second portion meet, the first portion and second portion folded towards one another at the bend so that the first portion and second portion are not coplanar; d) the first portion further comprising a web wrapping portion; e) a guy rope, a tent pole, and a canopy web; and f) wherein the guy rope is attached to the guy rope cutout, the tent pole is fitted in the tent pole cutout, and the canopy web is fastened to the web wrapping portion. 26 . The erected tent of claim 25 further comprising a clip fitted about the web wrapping portion, the clip for preventing the canopy web from wearing out against the web wrapping portion.
BACKGROUND [0001] Tents have been used as a means for providing shelter for many years, and come in a vast number of configurations. Some tents have canopies, sidewalls, and floors, making them substantially wind and water tight. Other tents are open air, having only a canopy. There are also the small “pop-up” tents which are frequently used by people camping. [0002] Larger tents, for example those used at weddings, picnic groves, military installations, and at outdoor events, may cover an area of several hundred square feet to many thousands of square feet. For these larger tents, the loads imposed by wind, rain, snow, and ice require the tent and its components to have increased structural strength. One of the structural components used to support the tent is the cleat, the cleat being the piece that connects with the tent canopy, the tent post, and the guy ropes/wires. The cleat thus experiences loading from the following: the guy wire, the post, and the canopy. In the past, these cleats were made of cast metal which is very prone to snapping and unpredictably failing. [0003] Additionally, after a tent is erected, the tent will sway in the wind, and it will flex under rain, snow, and ice loads. Over time, this constant motion causes the guy ropes to loosen, and this causes the tent to sway even more. Eventually, the tent will collapse, unless the guy ropes are constantly re-tightened. To draw the slack out of the guy ropes, crews of workers pull on the ropes and the slack is wrapped around the ground stake, and/or the ground stake is pounded deeper into the ground. This process not only calls for multiple workers, but takes a good deal of time and must be frequently repeated. [0004] Recently, ratchets have been used to speed up the process of taking the slack out of guy ropes. This is accomplished by installing a ratchet in a guy rope line, and providing the ratchet with a ratchet handle. One person, by moving the ratchet handle back and forth, can draw the desired amount of slack out of the guy rope, and this saves on time and expense. However, the use of ratchets has caused new problems. [0005] First, the person operating the ratchet has no indication of the amount of the load being imposed on the guy rope. Because of the mechanical advantage that can be achieved with a ratchet, a single person can now place a load on a guy wire equivalent to ten or more people pulling on the guy rope. The enormous loading that can be imposed by the ratchet typically causes something to break, and most frequently it is the cleat or tent bracket (hereinafter cleat) that snaps or fails. [0006] There are several reasons the cleats presently in use fail. One of them is the fact that cleats presently in use were never designed to withstand the loading imposed by a ratchet. Another is the fact that the worker operating the ratchet has no idea of how much stress is being applied to the guy wire and cleat, and thus does not know when to stop ratcheting. [0007] Yet another reason that cleats currently in use fail is because they are made of cast metal. Cast metal is poured into a die or mold and cooled. However, as cooling occurs, the outside edges of the cast piece cool and solidify first, while the center remains liquid. As the piece continues to cool, the liquid continues to shrink as it solidifies. This thus causes the cast piece to be, by its very nature, porous and prone to failure. This porosity weakens the piece, and this is one of the explanations that cast metal cleats are prone to snapping when placed under the loads imposed by the ratchet. [0008] Thus, there is a need for a cleat that can withstand loading without snapping. There is also a need for a cleat that can safely withstand the loads imposed by the ratchet without the cleat snapping and breaking. SUMMARY [0009] The present cleat overcomes the problems associated with cast cleats used up until now. The cleat comprises a body comprising a first side wall and a second side wall, with a surrounding side wall extending between the first side wall and second side wall. The surrounding side wall extends about the periphery of the body. The body further comprises a first portion that defines a web cutout and a tent pole cutout, and a second portion that defines a guy rope cutout. The body further comprises a bend where the first portion and the second portion meet. At the bend, the first portion and the second portion are folded towards one another and make between about a 145 to about a 165 degree angle relative to one another. [0010] The first portion is rectangular shaped and the second portion is trapezoidal shaped. The cleat comprises cold rolled steel, stainless steel, and steel alloys. The cleat is made of a non-cast metal, which provides the cleat with strength, and at the same time significantly reduces the possibility the cleat will fail when used in tent applications. [0011] The body further comprises a web wrapping portion formed adjacent to the web cutout. A clip is provided and is received in the web cutout and fitted about the web wrapping portion. The clip, which may comprise plastic, metal, or combinations thereof, is for preventing the canopy web of the tent from wearing out when the cleat is attached to the canopy web. [0012] The cleat is made by providing a sheet of steel, which may be cold rolled steel. A stamping machine stamps a web cutout, a tent pole cutout, and a guy rope cutout in the sheet of steel, and the rectangular and trapezoidal shapes are also stamped into the sheet of steel. Next, the sheet of steel is bent in a steel bending machine and formed into the body, the body comprising a first portion and a second portion that meet at a bend. The first portion comprises the tent pole cutout and the web cutout, and the second portion comprises the guy rope cutout. The first portion and second portion are not coplanar after bending. The body is bent to an extent that the first portion and second portion are at an angle of between 145 degrees to 165 degrees relative to one another. [0013] The cleat is installed in the canopy web by placing the canopy web through the web cutout defined in the cleat. A clip is provided to separate the canopy web from the cleat, and this prevents the canopy web from wearing out against the cleat. As the tent loosens over time, a worker need only move the handle of the ratchet that is installed in the guy rope line to remove slack. Thus, because the cleat is made of durable steel and has a bend, under normal use it will not snap or break when the worker uses the ratchet to draw up slack from the line, even if the worker places excessive tension in the guy rope. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES [0014] [0014]FIG. 1 shows a perspective view of the cleat and clip member joined together. [0015] [0015]FIG. 2 shows a perspective view of the cleat and clip member separated. [0016] [0016]FIG. 3 shows a top plan view of the clip and cleat. [0017] [0017]FIG. 4 shows a side elevational view of the clip and the cleat. [0018] [0018]FIG. 5 shows a front elevational view of the cleat. [0019] [0019]FIG. 6 shows a rear elevational view of the cleat. [0020] [0020]FIG. 7 shows a diagrammatic view of the cleat installed in an erected tent. [0021] [0021]FIG. 8 shows an exploded view of the cleat, guy rope, pole and tent web connection of FIG. 7. [0022] [0022]FIG. 9 shows an enlarged side elevational view of the cleat of FIGS. 7 and 8 installed in a tent. [0023] [0023]FIG. 10 shows a side elevational view of the cleat connected to the canopy web. [0024] [0024]FIG. 11 shows a diagrammatic view of the cleat installed in a tent. [0025] [0025]FIG. 12A shows a side elevational view of the second embodiment of the clip. [0026] [0026]FIG. 12B shows a top view of the second embodiment of the clip. [0027] [0027]FIG. 12C shows an end view of the second embodiment of the clip. DESCRIPTION [0028] The cleat 20 is shown in FIGS. 1-6 and it overcomes many of the problems associated with the cleats used in the past, because the structure of the cleat 20 allows it to withstand very heavy loads without failing. FIG. 7 shows a diagrammatic view of the cleat 20 installed in a tent 25 , and FIG. 8 shows an exploded view of FIG. 7. The cleat 20 can safely handle the combined loads imposed by the guy rope/wires 26 (hereinafter guy rope 26 ) as slack is removed from the guy rope 26 by the ratchet 28 , the canopy 24 , and the tent pole 22 . Hence, the chances the cleat 20 will snap when the ratchet 28 (FIG. 7) is used to take slack out of the first rope 40 (FIG. 7) are greatly decreased. The cleat 20 comprises cold rolled steel, and comprises a thickness, designated T in the figures, of about three millimeters to about seven millimeters, or in other embodiments about 0.188 inches thick. Of course, in other embodiments, the cleat 20 may comprise an even greater thickness to support more massive tents. The cleat 20 may also comprise stainless steel, steel alloys, suitable metal alloys, and other suitable non-cast metals. The cleat 20 may be coated with yellow zinc plating. The cleat 20 comprises a length (designated L in FIG. 3) that may be about 3.88 inches and further comprises a width (designated W in FIG. 3) that may be about 3.00 inches. These dimensions may be different in other embodiments of the cleat 20 . [0029] Turning now to FIGS. 7 and 8, shown therein are views of the cleat 20 installed in a tent 25 . In particular, the cleat 20 connects to the tent pole 22 , the canopy web 24 , and the guy rope 26 . The guy rope 26 comprises a first rope 40 having a first end 42 connected to a ground stake 44 , and a second end 46 fed into and through the ratchet mechanism 28 (ratchet 28 ). The guy rope 26 further comprises a second rope 48 comprising a ratchet end 50 attached to the ratchet 28 , and a hook end 52 comprising a hook 54 , the hook 54 for hooking to the cleat 20 . To remove slack from the guy rope 26 in a tent 25 that is standing, the user need only move the handle 29 of the ratchet 28 back and forth in the direction indicated by arrows A-A in FIG. 7. This causes the first rope 40 to be fed through the ratchet 28 , and in doing so removes slack from the guy rope 26 . The taken-up slack rope is indicated by reference number 47 in FIG. 7. As the ratchet 28 is operated, the loads on the cleat 20 increase significantly. The second rope 48 is hooked to the cleat 20 and attached to the ratchet 28 , but is not fed through the ratchet 28 as is the case with the first rope 40 . [0030] The structure of the cleat 20 provides for the strength required to withstand the loads imposed by the ratchet 28 . Shown in FIGS. 1-6 are views of the cleat 20 and the web preserving clip 21 , the utility of the web preserving clip 21 (hereinafter clip 21 ) to be described presently. The cleat 20 comprises a body 100 . The body 100 comprises a first side wall 72 , a second side wall 74 , and a surrounding side wall 76 that extends between the first side wall 72 and second side wall 74 . The surrounding side wall 76 extends along the periphery of the body 100 , and comprises a thickness designated T. The thickness T is about three millimeters to about seven millimeters, or in a particular embodiment, the thickness of the cleat 20 may be about 0.188 inches. In other embodiments, thickness T could be greater or lesser. [0031] A bend 68 is formed in the first side wall 72 , the second side wall 74 , and the surrounding sidewall 76 . At the bend 68 , the body 100 is shaped into a first portion 64 comprising a substantially rectangular shape 65 and a second portion 66 comprising a substantially trapezoidal shape 67 . Of course, in other embodiments, the first portion 64 and second portion 66 could comprise other shapes. For example, the second portion 66 could have a rectangular shape instead of the trapezoidal shape 67 . It is noted that at the bend 68 , the first side wall 72 is partly folded in upon itself, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 8. That is, the trapezoidal shaped 67 second portion 66 makes an angle with respect to the rectangular shaped 65 first portion 64 , as shown in FIGS. 4 and 8. This angle may be about 155 degrees. It is to be understood that the angle the first and second portions 64 , 66 respectively, make with one another could be otherwise embodied, and this angle could be about 145 degrees to about 165 degrees. [0032] The first portion 64 defines a web cutout 80 that is a generally the shape of a rectangle, but the shorter sides of the rectangle are rounded, as shown in FIGS. 1-3. The first portion 64 also defines a tent pole cutout 82 that comprises a circular shape. The tent pole cutout 82 may comprise a diameter of about 0.375 inches, but in other embodiments, this diameter may be varied to accommodate differently sized tent poles. The first portion 64 further comprises a web wrapping portion 70 adjacent to the web cutout 80 , as shown in FIGS. 1-3. The second portion 66 defines a guy rope cutout 84 that comprises a circular shape, as shown in FIGS. 1-6. The guy rope cutout 84 may comprise a diameter of about 0.88 inches, but in other embodiments, this diameter could be differently sized to accommodate differently sized guy ropes 26 . [0033] Method of Making The Cleat [0034] In an embodiment, the cleat 20 is made from a piece of cold rolled steel. The piece of steel is stamped, and the first portion 64 that comprises the rectangular shape 65 , and the second portion 66 that comprises the trapezoidal shape 67 are stamped out of the piece of steel. The act of stamping also stamps the web cutout 80 and the tent pole cutout 82 into the first portion 64 , and the guy rope cutout 84 in the second portion 66 . At this point, because there is no bend 68 , and the first portion 64 and the second portion 66 are coplanar, and the first wall 72 and second wall 74 are each planar. The edges, commonly indicated by reference number 88 in the figures, of the web cutout 80 , tent pole cutout 82 , and guy rope cutout 84 are smooth after the stamping process. This is better than the cast cleat of the past, wherein the edges of the cast cutouts had rough, jagged projections that undesirably cut into and ruined the guy rope 26 and canopy web 24 . [0035] Next, the stamped piece of steel is placed in a steel bending machine. The steel is bent to form the body 100 . The body 100 is formed so first side wall 72 is folded in upon itself at the bend 68 , as shown in FIGS. 4 and 8. In other words, the first portion 64 is bent at an angle with respect to the second portion 66 . The angle of the bend 68 in this example is about 155 degrees, as shown in FIGS. 4 and 8. As previously described, in other embodiments, this angle may be varied. At this point, the body 100 is ready for installation in a tent 25 . It is noted that after bending, the first portion 64 and second portion 66 are each still planar, but they are no longer coplanar because of the bend 68 , and the first side wall 72 and the second side wall 74 are no longer planar after bending. [0036] Use of the Cleat in Erection of Tent [0037] Reference is now made to FIGS. 7 and 8. FIG. 7 shows a diagrammatic view of the tent 25 using a cleat 20 , and FIG. 8 shows and exploded view of the cleat 20 , guy rope 26 , pole 22 , and canopy web 24 . FIG. 9 shows an enlarged side elevational view of the cleat of FIGS. 7 installed in a tent, and FIG. 10 shows a view of the connection between the cleat 20 and the canopy web 24 . FIG. 11 shows a view further illustrating how the cleat 20 is installed in a tent 25 , but the tent pole 22 and guy wire 26 are not shown for purposes of clarity. It is noted that the cleat 20 may come to the user pre-attached to the tent 25 canopy web 24 . [0038] Prior to installing the cleat 20 in the tent, the user moves the clip 21 around the web wrapping portion 70 , such that it surrounds the web wrapping portion 70 . At the same time the clip 21 is received in the web cutout 80 defined in the first portion 64 , as shown in FIG. 8. The clip 21 may comprise plastic, metals, sheet metal, or combinations thereof, and one of its purposes is to prevent the canopy web 24 from wearing out against the web wrapping portion 70 . This prolongs the lifespan of the canopy web 24 and the tent canopy 27 . The canopy web 24 is then moved around and secured to the web wrapping portion 70 . The clip 21 is thus captured between the web wrapping portion 70 and the canopy web 24 , and it prevents the canopy web 24 from contacting and being damaged by the web wrapping portion 70 . [0039] [0039]FIGS. 12A, 12B, and 12 C shows another embodiment of the clip 21 . Here the clip 21 comprises a body 300 comprising planer side walls 302 , and a planar top 304 . The length of the planar top 304 , designated J in FIG. 12B, is about 1.8 inches. The length, designated K in FIG. 12C of the planar sidewall 302 , is about 0.56 inches. Lastly, the width, designated P in FIG. 12C, of the body 300 may be about 0.20 inches of course, in other embodiments all of these dimensions may be differently sized. The body 300 may comprise sheet metal, sheet steel, or plastic. [0040] The tent pole 22 is then moved through the tent pole cutout 82 in the first portion 64 of the cleat 20 . In particular, the tent pole 22 is moved through the cleat 20 in such a manner that it first approaches the first side wall 72 of the cleat 20 . Then, it is moved through the first side wall 72 of the cleat 20 , and passes out the second side wall 74 of the cleat 20 . The movement of the tent pole 22 stops when the stop surface 23 of the pole 22 contacts the first side wall 72 of the body 100 , as shown in FIG. 8. The hook 54 at the hook end 52 of the second rope 48 is moved into the guy rope cutout 84 , and the ratchet end 50 of the second rope 48 is connected to the ratchet 28 . At this point, the first end 42 of the first rope 40 is attached to the ground stake 44 , and its second end 46 is fed into the ratchet 28 . The user then begins moving the handle 29 of the ratchet 28 back and forth in the direction of arrow A-A, shown in FIG. 7, to draw the slack out of the first rope 40 . The taken up slack is indicated by reference number 47 in FIG. 7. [0041] The slack is taken up by the user moving the handle 29 of the ratchet 28 back and forth until the guy rope 26 is sufficiently taught. The user can gauge when to stop taking up slack by assessing how taught the guy rope 26 is and visually assessing the tent canopy 27 . If the user errors and begins to take too much slack out of the guy rope 26 , the above-described structure of the cleat 20 prevents its catastrophic failure, because it can safely handle excessive loads imposed by the ratchet 28 . Thus, the cleat 20 allows ratchets 28 to be used to draw slack out of guy ropes 26 without the risk of the cleat 20 unpredictable snapping or breaking. [0042] Also, as shown in FIG. 9, the bend 68 in the cleat 20 allows the second portion 66 , the canopy 27 of the tent 25 , and the guy rope 26 to be substantially in line. This alignment decreases the likelihood the cleat 20 will snap as slack is drawn out of the guy rope 26 , because the forces exerted on the cleat from the guy rope 26 are substantially linear. In other words, the alignment decreases deleterious bending moments from being applied to the cleat 20 , thus decreasing the likelihood the cleat 20 will fail. [0043] It is noted that the guy rope 26 could be embodied as nylon strap, steel wire, steel cable, and other materials capable of withstanding the loads imposed by the ratchet 28 . Also, the cleat 20 could be installed in tents wherein there is no ratchet 28 attached to the guy rope 26 . In that embodiment, the guy rope 26 shown in FIG. 8 would be a single rope attached directly from the cleat 20 to the ground stake 44 . Thus, the cleat 20 is very versatile in that it can be used in any tent, regardless of whether a ratchet 28 is used to draw slack out of the guy rope 26 or a team of workers pull the slack out of the guy rope 26 . In other words, the cleat 20 may be used in a tent that has no ratchet 28 attached to the guy rope 26 . [0044] It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that while the cleat 20 has been described above in connection with particular embodiments and examples, the cleat 20 is not necessarily so limited and that other embodiments, examples, uses, modifications, and departures from the embodiments, examples and uses may be made without departing from the cleat 20 , and all these other embodiments are intended to come within the scope of the claims.

Description

Topics

Download Full PDF Version (Non-Commercial Use)

Patent Citations (15)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    US-1053255-AFebruary 18, 1913Frederick H WardStaff-holder.
    US-2001014997-A1August 23, 2001Nsk Autoliv Co., LtdSeat belt device
    US-3223098-ADecember 14, 1965Jr Charles M DoleCollapsible shelter construction
    US-4038727-AAugust 02, 1977Robbins F PeterOpenable and closeable self-tightening clip
    US-4782846-ANovember 08, 1988Ting Lawrence SFooting support for securement of tent
    US-5036874-AAugust 06, 1991Lynch James PTensioned tent structure and erection method therefor
    US-5333634-AAugust 02, 1994Delbert TaylorInverse umbrella tent
    US-5345962-ASeptember 13, 1994Moss C WilliamArch supported fabric structure
    US-5615699-AApril 01, 1997Jinwoong, Inc.Base bracket for tents and poles
    US-5884646-AMarch 23, 1999Bae Jin CorporationFoldable tent frame for coupling tent cloth with tent frame in integral form
    US-5918614-AJuly 06, 1999Lynch; James P.Configurable shade structure including a kit and method therefor
    US-5954077-ASeptember 21, 1999Jinwoong, Inc.Multipurpose tent pole termination device
    US-6092342-AJuly 25, 2000Sharapata; Alex RaymondPole anchor base plate
    US-6219888-B1April 24, 2001James P. LynchAnchor device
    US-6681786-B2January 27, 2004Baejin CorporationDetachable means for instant setup foldable tent

NO-Patent Citations (0)

    Title

Cited By (0)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle